Latest Stories

James

James Walsh is standing for election on 5 May to be the second Labour councillor in Stoke ward, alongside Cllr Angela Gunning.

 

The people in Stoke ward need another Labour councillor to work hard for them, because they have been let down badly - A by-election has been called in Stoke Ward after the former Conservative councillor didn’t do any work or represent Stoke residents at any council meetings at all.

James has loads of experience in getting things done. Before he married and settled down in Guildford, he was a councillor and cabinet member, running Slough Borough for six years.   There he represented residents on hundreds of issues – from fixing roads to clearing fly-tipping and housing problems. He will be a strong and experienced voice sticking up for Stoke.

You will be able to contact James all-year round by phone, by email and face-to-face; he'll be working for you and your family day by day.

James Walsh- a man who gets things done

James Walsh is standing for election on 5 May to be the second Labour councillor in Stoke ward, alongside Cllr Angela Gunning.  

On June 23rd the British people will face a choice, not on the issues which David Cameron has been negotiating on, but on whether to stay in Europe, or to leave. Labour is fighting a campaign in this referendum to remain, because we believe Britain is better off in Europe.

Our campaign is separate from Britain Stronger In Europe, the cross-party campaign, although we share the same objectives. We are campaigning to stay in Europe to protect the millions of jobs that are linked to British trade with Europe, and the investment and growth that being part of the world’s largest single market brings.

Almost half of our exports go to EU countries. Large companies from all over the world choose to build offices and factories in the UK, and recruit staff here, because we are a gateway to the European single market.

Labour has a distinctive voice in this campaign, emphasising protections for workers, consumers, and the environment. These are all protections that Labour governments helped to win in Brussels and that are now safeguarded in EU law. The Tories were prevented in their renegotiation from hitting British workers’ rights to minimum paid leave, rights for agency workers, guaranteed paid maternity and paternity leave and protection from discrimination. But a vote to leave would leave these crucial protections vulnerable to an attack.

EU agreements also protect British consumers, saving the average family around £450 a year due to the lower prices that come from being part of the biggest consumer market in the world.

Working with Europe gives Britain more influence than when we act alone. We are stronger at negotiating trade deals with larger countries like China and the USA as part of the EU. Because problems like climate change, terrorism and organised crime don’t respect national borders, they are most effectively addressed by working together with our European neighbours. And because we are part of the European Union but outside the Schengen borderless zone, we can take full advantage of Europe-wide security cooperation while keeping our own borders secure.

Protecting Britain’s interests means ensuring we have a strong voice at the top table. Like all institutions, the EU requires reform. But if we leave, Britain will still have to follow EU rules if we want to access the single market – we just won't have any say in making the rules anymore. That’s been Norway’s experience.

Britain is better off in Europe. It brings us jobs, growth and investment whilst protecting British workers and consumers. Leaving would put all that at risk and diminish Britain’s influence in the world.  That’s Labour case in this referendum.

You can find out more about the Labour In For Britain campaign, and get involved at labour.org.uk/InForBritain

 

l530cb10-b308-6974-4dd2-b683b49063fc.jpg

 

 

All ages for staying IN

On June 23rd the British people will face a choice, not on the issues which David Cameron has been negotiating on, but on whether to stay in Europe, or to...

With the recent speculation about the raising of the pension age, Guildford Labour Party members were fortunate to listen to Professor Sara Arber of Surrey University's Dept. of Sociology on the subject of gender inequality in income in later life-a subject which affects women-and men-of all ages, but currently having a huge negative impact on women in the 50-60 age group.

 

For women currently in their 50's and early 60's, feminism in the workplace largely passed them by: childcare, low pay (sometimes unequal pay), and the glass ceiling mean they face a period of poverty post 60,  as they face living off savings which should have supplemented their pension, rather than replace it.

That these changes were put in place fairly recently-and keep changing- it means many women who thought they had planned for their retirement now face an uncertain future. Pension age rising to 65 and 66 means many older people living solely on savings. With the current high cost of childcare and elderly care, many women in this age group find themselves giving up work to provide care for elderly relatives and/or childcare for their grandchildren, to enable their parents  to work to meet the cost of living in the 21st Century. This has a negative impact on women's pensions, as they stop work early and often have breaks in service and pension contributions.

While women live, on average, 4 years longer than men, this means more women can expect to be  widowed, with concomitant rises in disability and a need for care. Changing family structures mean there is a lack of family provided care, leaving women relying on expensive external care.

There is also the question of health to consider. If someone is healthy then they could continue working, but with age often comes increased ill health and infirmity, with many unable to continue working.

 

Occupation is also a factor- manual workers may find it impossible to work post 65, and employers are reluctant to employ older people, and where they do, these are often in low paid jobs.

In summation, pension reform matters to all of us, but is potentially much more damaging for women.

This was an extremely interesting, thought provoking and no doubt depressing for some- talk by Dr Arber, and Guildford Labour Party would like to thank her very much.

Women, pensions and gender equality

With the recent speculation about the raising of the pension age, Guildford Labour Party members were fortunate to listen to Professor Sara Arber of Surrey University's Dept. of Sociology on...

More Stories >

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better.

Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.

To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.